Noodles. They are one of my FAAAVORITE meals. There is absolutely nothing that I will choose over a bowl of noodles and soup. Lets measure ‘em up.

This article deals only with Japanese noodles. Chow mien, and Thai noodles are not covered, mostly because I only eat them. I have no knowledge of how to make them.

So, what are the types of noodles?


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Ramen are noodles prepared in a bowl of soup with various toppings.


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Udon noodles are made of wheat flour and are thicker than soba.


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Soba noodles are made of buckwheat flour and are about as thick as
spaghetti


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Somen are wheat flour noodles, mostly fried up and served with egg, chicken, fish, or veggies.


I’ll now talk about Ramen, because I find it the easiest to find ingredients for.

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Ramen is Japanese noodle soup consisting of wheat noodles, rich broth and meat / vegetable toppings. Ramen is one of the most popular foods in Japan. Ramen noodles are made from flour and water kneaded in the ratio of 7 to 3. Ramen soup is usually prepared with soup formula and broth.

There are a few different soup types

  • Shoyu (“soy sauce”) soup
  • Miso (“soybean paste”) soup
  • Tonkotsu (“pork bone”) soup
  • Shio (“salt”) soup

Noodles also vary in thickness

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Toppings and side dishes really set each bowl apart

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Different types of Ramen:

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Kagoshima Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bean sprouts, wood-ear mushrooms with mild broth of pork, chicken, and veggie stock finished with burnt onions. Noodles are cooked quite a bit past al dente, and can be either quite thin or quite thick, reflecting influences from both Okinawa and Taiwan.


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Hakata Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, nori, pickled ginger, garlic, spicy mustard greens (takana), garlic, sesame seeds, garlic, pink pickled ginger, spicy mustard greens, and soy base with thin, unrisen noodles .


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Kyoto Ramen: Of Kotteri-kei: roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots, spicy chives, minced garlic, chili bean paste, white pepper with thick, gritty chicken-soup culled mostly from chicken, topped with spicy bean paste, chives, garlic, and pungent local kujnoegi onions.


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Tokyo Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots, fish cake, nori, spinach pork, chicken, veggies, kombu seaweed, shaved bonito flakes (katsuobushi), and other dried fish set atop curly noodles.


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Yokohama Ie-kei Ramen: Three sheets of nori, stewed spinach, garlic, ginger, spicy bean paste with firm noodles.


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Shirakawa Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots, fish cake, nori, wontons, spinach with springy noodles with lots of give in the chew.


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Kitakata Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots with noodles that are hand-cut to be flat, wide, and curly.


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Hakodate Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo, nori, spinach, fish cake (naruto) with noodles that are cooked to be quite soft.


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Sapporo Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, minced pork, ginger, garlic, butter, corn with regular sized noodles of even firmness.


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Asahikawa Ramen: Roast pork, scallions, bamboo shoots, lard with thick noodles of even firmness.


Ramen are quite easy to make if you get the hang of it. A big container of almost prepared ramen, covered up in a dry place, will last a week without losing taste. Soup can be prepared for 3 days and kept in special containers and heated up as needed.

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For Instant Ramen noodles, refer here: http://web-japan.org/kidsweb/hitech…



:D