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Tweet Tuesday: Birds of Brazil

It’s a late Olympic Version of Tweet Tuesday. Brazil is home to a complex ecological landscape, having tropical, semi-arid, humid subtropical, humid coastal and equatorial humid climates. This means that there is a diversity of wildlife, including birds. Pictured above is the Golden Parakeet (also known as the Golden Conure or Queen of Bavaria Conure). These beautiful birds were recently downlisted from Endangered to Vulnerable, which is wonderful news, but like many birds and other types of wildlife, they are subject to habitat loss. They are often described as rare and energetic birds, demanding attention and affection and reward it with comical acrobatic tricks.

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Next is the National Bird of Brazil, the rufous-belly thrush or the sabiá-laranjeira. They are found in forests and urban areas throughout southeastern Brazil (they were the official state bird of Sao Paulo before they became the national bird)

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The Rufous-bellied Thrush is our official national bird. However, many feel more of a connection towards brazilian species of Parrots and Macaws. The Thrush was chosen because it’s part of Gonçalves Dias’ Canção do Exílio (Song of the Exile) and because it’s so common, its new status won’t increase ilegal bird traffic, a serious danger for parrots and macaws.

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From here.

My homeland has many palm-trees
and the thrush-song fills its air;
no bird here can sing as well
as the birds sing over there.

We have fields more full of flowers
and a starrier sky above,
we have woods more full of life
and a life more full of love.

Lonely night-time meditations
please me more when I am there;
my homeland has many palm-trees
and the thrush-song fills its air.

Such delights as my land offers
Are not found here nor elsewhere;
lonely night-time meditations
please me more when I am there;
My homeland has many palm-trees
and the thrush-song fills its air.

Don’t allow me, God, to die
without getting back to where
I belong, without enjoying
the delights found only there,
without seeing all those palm-trees,
hearing thrush-songs fill the air.

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Finally is the vibrantly winged Brazilian Teal Ducks, the only one of the genus, Amazonetta. This bird species is abundant and lives throughout South America, from Brazil to Uruguay and Argentina to Colombia and Venezuela. One fun fact is that both bird parents care for their young and they live in either pairs or groups. Egalitarian.

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You can look at many of them at this site or here. Share your favorites.

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