But it's an important read. This is a really beautiful story. Painful, but beautiful.

Jamie is my son. He is 22 years old. He is a bright, gregarious, effervescent young man with an amazing cataloguing memory and an insatiable intellectual curiosity about the world — its people, its creatures, its nations, its languages and (perhaps most of all) its culinary traditions. If it were possible for him to travel everywhere on the inhabited globe, he would do it, and he would try to ingratiate himself with his hosts, just as he does when he greets the owner of our local Indian restaurant by bowing, hands clasped, and saying "namaskar." (The owner, Sohan, is delighted by this.) Since graduation, he has been looking for work. Jamie also has Down syndrome.

At 13, Jamie reported that he wanted to be a marine biologist. A very tall order, I thought; but he knew the differences between seals and sea lions, he knew that dolphins are pinnipeds, and he knew far more about sharks than most sixth graders. And despite his speech delays, he could say "cartilaginous fish" pretty clearly. Perhaps he could work at an aquarium?

I wanted to pull some other quotes for you but the build of the story is fine-tuned so precisely that I'm reluctant to lessen the impact.

This one will make you think and feel. Take a couple of minutes and read it.

​You Might Cry