Photographer Wyatt Neumann took candid photos of his toddler daughter during a road trip the two took together and included them in his online galleries. Then he was attacked by a particular group for posting "pornographic" images and had his Instagram and Facebook shut down.

So he decided to juxtapose the images taken in a completely nonsexual context with the critical comments accusing him of perversity.

The title of the subsequent exhibition, "I FEEL SORRY FOR YOUR CHILDREN –- The Sexualization of Innocence in America," was in part inspired by an online comment attached to one of Neumann's works that read: "The whole thing is sickening and I FEEL SORRY FOR YOUR CHILDREN." The exhibition examines the attacks launched against his photographs as well as what he sees as a segment of contemporary culture, thriving off shame and censorship, that incited such attacks.

"When I decided to do the show I was so upset and I was like, You know what? I think this is beautiful," Neumann continued. "I'm going to show these to the world the way that I saw them when I took them. I'm going to put them in beautiful frames on beautiful walls in a beautiful gallery."

The exhibition proudly displays Neumann's photos, while raising the questions asked by anonymous online critics in a public sphere. Are these images pornography or art? Exploitation or expression? Is the human body a site of shame or wonder? Fear or freedom? These questions are not only at the core of this exhibition, but of a debate about the sexualization of young girls that far exceeds the parameters of the art world.

More, including some photos for your own judgement, here.